AKA: robertmeta

Random thoughts, terrible art and being wrong online since 1994.

Robert Melton

last update:

Effective Windows

This is how I make Windows an effective platform for my day to day use. These tools follow no theme or trend, it is just the things I depend on, I will be keeping this post updated.

Sustaining Support

Over the past year, I have become a big fan of the direct sustaining support model for things I care about. Here are the things I am currently supporting.

This post is for neophyte developers looking for a free, relatively straightforward project to give them hard and soft development skills while increasing their online profile.

Standing Still

TL;DR: Staying in place is significantly more desirable to employees than leaving, hence less rewards required.

The Three Big Lies

Mike Acton recently gave a wonderful talk at CppCon about Data-Oriented Design. I wholeheartedly encourage you to watch it.

Inside this talk are specifics related to c/c++ and compilers… as you would expect from a c++ conference. But, more importantly (to me) underlying it all is a wonderful set of principles that are elegantly expressed by Mike Acton, this post is an attempt to summarize the language agnostic principles I took away from his talk, from the reference point of his «three big lies».

The last few weeks of work have been an embarrassing cavalcade of mistakes. The majority of this project was well worn territory for me, with a few new problems sprinkled in. With new unique problems you have to dive in and start someone, every starting point I picked ended up being a black hole of misery and wasted time. We have since recovered, but the experience reminded me of a few brilliant TED talks about exactly these topics…

Learn at least a half dozen programming languages. Include one language that supports class abstractions (like Java or C++), one that supports functional abstraction (like Lisp or ML), one that supports syntactic abstraction (like Lisp), one that supports declarative specifications (like Prolog or C++ templates), one that supports coroutines (like Icon or Scheme), and one that supports parallelism (like Sisal).